FAQs – Burglary Prevention and Home Removals

In what follows below, an expert in the removals industry will offer some responses to questions relating to burglary prevention when moving home. Why are the subjects of home removals and burglary linked? In many respects, they are not! Burglary is unfortunately an ever-present risk for almost every household and that's the case wherever you…

In what follows below, an expert in the removals industry will offer some responses to questions relating to burglary prevention when moving home.

Why are the subjects of home removals and burglary linked?

In many respects, they are not!

Burglary is unfortunately an ever-present risk for almost every household and that's the case wherever you have been living in a property for years or are in the course of moving home.

However, there may be times when burglary can be linked to home removals. That may happen in situations where you own or are renting a property but are unable to immediately move into it for one reason or another.

As burglars typically prefer unoccupied properties, the risks may be higher in such circumstances.

What can I do if a must leave either the property I'm vacating of the one I'm purchasing, unoccupied for a while?

In the case of most removals, where a property at either end of the chain is going to sit unoccupied, it will also typically be empty. That's important because while vandals may be attracted by any property that is unoccupied, including those that are empty, most burglars typically will not be because they are after the contents – contents that will not be there.

Whenever you are able to immediately move into a property, whether furnished or empty, it would be prudent to make sure that it is well protected by alarms and security locks. Where feasible, you can also ask neighbors to keep an eye on the property until you are in a position to move in.

Is there anything I can do to guarantee that burglars and vandals will not be able to gain entry?

No. It's as simple as that.

Some of the most secure locations in the world including banks and exclusive jewelers have been successfully burgled in spite of a plethora of security systems.

However, it's important to keep in mind that most of us are illegally to be facing such a threat. The vast majority of domestic burglars and vandals are opportunistic – they're looking for fast, instinctive and easy opportunities that can take advantage of at a given moment. They are not master criminals planning months ahead.

So again, this comes back to making sure that your property is reasonably secured with approved quality locks, bolts and burglar alarm systems. If the criminals think that it looks “tricky”, they will almost always move on to somewhere that looks to be easier pickings.

Even though, you can not turn your property into a fortress.

Why do some security professionals talk about disguising your property?

Burglars are extremely unlikely to enter a property if:

  • they believe it to be occupied at the time;
  • it appears as if there is nothing of obvious value in it to steal;
  • it is well protected by appropriate security systems.

The last of those points has been dealt with previously.

The first point is interesting because it means you should avoid anything that obviously advertises that your property is going to stand empty or more correctly “unoccupied”, while you are moving. Examples include mail building up, grass going uncut and curtains being left open with no lights on once it gets dark.

The second point is also relatively common sense.

If your windows are close to a public thoroughfare and you have what might be called “open curtains”, burglars will be able to quickly glance in your window to see what's inside. If you have some of your most valuable and prized possessions conveniently on display and easily visible from the window, your property could have been marked as a potential target.

Avoiding all these things generally helps avoid your property being seen as vulnerable or a worthy target.